Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition alcohol abuse
Treatments brief motivational intervention (bmi), substance-free activity session (sfas), relaxation session
Sponsor University of Memphis
Start date July 2012
End date July 2017
Trial size 393 participants
Trial identifier NCT02834949, 5R01AA020829-03

Summary

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a Substance-Free Activity Session (SFAS) as a supplement to a brief motivation intervention (BMI) in reducing alcohol use and alcohol-related consequences in college students.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Endpoint classification efficacy study
Intervention model parallel assignment
Masking open label
Primary purpose treatment
Arm
(Experimental)
Participants first receive a 50-minute standard brief motivational intervention designed to reduce alcohol use. A week later, they will receive the SFAS (Substance-free Activity Session., a 50-minute counseling session designed to increase the salience of the student's academic and career goals, draw attention to the potentially negative relationship between substance use and goal accomplishment, and increase engagement in substance-free alternative activities. The SFAS will be described to participants as the "College Adjustment Session" and the session will be conducted using an MI plus personalized feedback approach.
brief motivational intervention (bmi)
This session includes a discussion related to harm reduction and the student's autonomy to make decisions about the information provided in the session; an alcohol use decisional balance exercise; personalized alcohol-related feedback, and goal-setting. Elements included in the feedback are: (a) comparison of the student's perception of how much college students drink and actual student norms, (b) a comparison of the student's alcohol consumption vs. norms, (c) an estimate of the student's peak blood alcohol content in the past month, (d) alcohol-related problems experienced, (e) money spent on alcohol, and (f) calories consumed from alcohol. Participants discuss the personalized feedback with the clinician and review protective behavioral strategies if he or she indicates interest.
substance-free activity session (sfas)
The clinician initiates a discussion of the student's college and career goals. Students discuss the values that motivate them as well as how alcohol use may interfere with their ability to accomplish these goals. Students then receive information on graduation rates and income benefits for those who attend and excel in college. They receive personalized feedback on (a) the requirements for their major and intended career, (b) a list of extracurricular activities tailored to their goals, (c) a graph showing time they allocate to their activities, (d) information on stress and depressive symptoms (if applicable) and possible adaptive coping responses and (e) a list of substance-free recreational activities in which they would like to start or continuing engaging.
(Active Comparator)
Participants first receive a 50-minute standard brief motivational intervention designed to reduce alcohol use. A week later, they will receive a relaxation training session. In the relaxation training session, the clinician leads the student through a diaphragmatic breathing exercise, followed by a progressive muscle relaxation protocol (~30 minutes). At the end of the session, participants will be asked about their reaction to the relaxation techniques and provided with relaxation training handouts.
brief motivational intervention (bmi)
This session includes a discussion related to harm reduction and the student's autonomy to make decisions about the information provided in the session; an alcohol use decisional balance exercise; personalized alcohol-related feedback, and goal-setting. Elements included in the feedback are: (a) comparison of the student's perception of how much college students drink and actual student norms, (b) a comparison of the student's alcohol consumption vs. norms, (c) an estimate of the student's peak blood alcohol content in the past month, (d) alcohol-related problems experienced, (e) money spent on alcohol, and (f) calories consumed from alcohol. Participants discuss the personalized feedback with the clinician and review protective behavioral strategies if he or she indicates interest.
relaxation session
The session includes a clinician-led diaphragmatic breathing exercise, followed by a progressive muscle relaxation protocol (~30 minutes). At the end of the session, participants will be asked about their reaction to the relaxation techniques and provided with relaxation training handouts.
(No Intervention)
Participants will fill out a battery of measures and receive no intervention.

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Change in Alcohol Use from baseline to follow-up (4 timepoints)
time frame: Baseline, 1-month, 6-months, 12-months and 16-months
Change in Alcohol-related Problems from baseline to follow-up (4 timepoints)
time frame: Baseline, 1-month, 6-months, 12-months and 16-months

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants from 18 years up to 27 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - Male and female University of Memphis and University of Missouri - College freshman or sophomore - Full time student status - Report 2 or more heavy drinking episodes (5/4 drinks for men/women) in the past month Exclusion Criteria: - Employed more than 20 hours per week

Additional Information

Official title Improving Brief Alcohol Interventions With a Behavioral Economic Supplement
Principal investigator James G Murphy, Ph.D.
Description BMIs are associated with reductions in alcohol consumption and related problems, but effect sizes are generally small. One BMI trial indicated that behavioral economic variables such as low levels of proportionate substance-free reinforcement and inelastic demand for alcohol predicted poor intervention response, and that participants who successfully reduced their drinking increased their participation in academic and other substance-free activities. A subsequent NIAAA R21 developed a substance-free activity session (SFAS) supplement to traditional alcohol BMIs that attempted to increase engagement in constructive alternatives to drinking by enhancing the salience of delayed rewards (academic and career success) and the patterns of behavior (academic engagement) leading to these outcomes. This study indicated that a two session (alcohol BMI + SFAS) preventive intervention resulted in significantly greater reductions in alcohol problems relative to a two session (alcohol BMI + Relaxation) active control condition. The BMI+ SFAS was also associated with significantly greater reductions in heavy drinking for participants with lower levels of substance-free reinforcement at baseline. This was the first controlled study to demonstrate that a supplement to traditional BMIs can improve outcomes. The current study will extend these promising pilot results by (a) increasing the efficacy of the behavioral economic SFAS by including booster contact, (b) increasing power and generalizability by recruiting 425 students from two universities and including a no-treatment control group, (c) measuring drinking, as well as behavioral economic mechanisms as mediators and moderators of intervention outcomes (delay discounting, alcohol reinforcing efficacy, substance-free reinforcement) at 5 time points over a sixteen month period, and (d) evaluating the economic costs and benefits associated with the SFAS. The goals of the SFAS - increasing student engagement in academic, campus, and career-related activities- are consistent with the priorities of most colleges.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in July 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of Memphis.