Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition healthy
Treatments normal, moderate, high, controlled-diet
Sponsor University of Toronto
Collaborator Ajinomoto Co., Inc.
Start date May 2016
End date September 2017
Trial size 9 participants
Trial identifier NCT02801344, PFE

Summary

Protein requirements in individuals who participate in endurance-based exercise training have been suggested to be greater than the current recommended dietary allowance (RDA).

Our recent study using the minimally invasive indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) technique have suggested that protein requirements in young men are at least 30% higher than the recommended protein intake.

The present study will investigate the impact of protein sufficiency on protein metabolism and performance during intensified training periods as a means to further our understanding of the nutritional requirements for the endurance athlete.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Intervention model crossover assignment
Masking double blind (subject, outcomes assessor)
Primary purpose basic science
Arm
(Experimental)
participants will receive the controlled-diet containing 0.8 g protein /kg/day and the test drink containing 0.14 g protein/kg/d.
normal
test drink which contains low amount of amino acids (0.14 g/kg/day)
controlled-diet
the diet containing 0.8 g protein /kg/day
(Experimental)
participants will receive the controlled-diet containing 1.20 g protein /kg/day and the test drink containing 0.40 g protein/kg/d.
moderate
test drink which contains moderate amount of amino acids (0.40 g/kg/day)
controlled-diet
the diet containing 0.8 g protein /kg/day
(Experimental)
participants will receive the controlled-diet containing 1.83 g protein /kg/day and the test drink containing 1.03 g protein/kg/d.
high
test drink which contains high amount of amino acids (1.03 g/kg/day)
controlled-diet
the diet containing 0.8 g protein /kg/day

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Change in 24h whole body protein balance
time frame: Difference between day 1 and day 4 whole body protein balance

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Change from baseline physical performance (5 km time trial) 5days after the beginning of training
time frame: 5days after the beginning of training
change from baseline Physical performance (muscle strength) 5days after the beginning of training
time frame: 5days after the beginning of training
change from baseline Physical Performance (muscle power) 5days after the beginning of training
time frame: 5days after the beginning of training

Eligibility Criteria

Male participants from 18 years up to 50 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - Healthy, male, endurance-trained participants who have run regularly more than 45 km or 4.5 hours/week - Participants who are categorized at least "very good" based on a study by Shvartz & Reibold [40], in which peak rate of oxygen consumption(VO2 Peak) is used as an index. (i.e. the participants whose VO2peak is ≥57 ml/kg/min (18-24 y), ≥54 ml/kg/min (25-29 y), ≥52 ml/kg/min (30-34 y), ≥49 ml/kg/min (35-39 y), ≥47 ml/kg/min (40-44 y), ≥44 ml/kg/min (45-50 y) according to his age, - Participants who can cover 10 km in less than 60 min after the VO2peak test and 5 km Time trial on session 2. - Participants will be 18-50 years old. - Participants are willing to abide by the compliance rules of this study Exclusion Criteria: - Inability to meet health and physical activity guidelines according to the The Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire for everyone. - Female - Inability to adhere to any of the compliance rules judged by principal investigator or medical doctor - Regular tobacco use - Illicit drug use (e.g. growth hormone, testosterone, etc.)

Additional Information

Official title The Impact of Protein Intake on Amino Acid and Protein Metabolism, and Performance During Intensified Training
Principal investigator Daniel Moore, Ph.D.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in June 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of Toronto.