Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Conditions sleep apnea, insomnia
Treatments cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, armodafinil, placebo
Sponsor University of Pennsylvania
Collaborator Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, Ltd.
Start date April 2014
End date July 2015
Trial size 72 participants
Trial identifier NCT02552303, 817800

Summary

The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of Armodafinil, CBT-I, or the combination of the two on the sleep continuity of persons suffering from sleep disordered breathing and their adherence to CBT-I and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP). Adults diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea and who meet additional research and diagnostic criteria for insomnia will be recruited. Participants will submit daily sleep diaries and supplemental questionnaires as measures of study progress.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Intervention model parallel assignment
Masking double blind (subject, caregiver)
Primary purpose treatment
Arm
(Active Comparator)
CBT-I with Armodafinil (active medication)
cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia CBT-I
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.
armodafinil NuVigil
Active medication
(Placebo Comparator)
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia with Placebo medication
cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia CBT-I
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.
placebo
Placebo for Nuvigil (armodafinil)
(Active Comparator)
Medication (armodafinil) only, without CBTI.
armodafinil NuVigil
Active medication
(Placebo Comparator)
Placebo only, without CBTI.
placebo
Placebo for Nuvigil (armodafinil)

Primary Outcomes

Measure
The change in Sleep Continuity from baseline to follow-up, as measured by the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI).
time frame: ISI is measured once at baseline and once at follow-up (8-10 weeks apart)

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Change in CBT-I attrition rate.
time frame: average of 8 weeks of active study
The difference in subject drop-out rates, comparing subjects taking active v. placebo study medication
time frame: up to 8 weeks of active study
Exploratory Aim: The overall change in Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores
time frame: baseline to follow-up (average total of 12 weeks)
Exploratory Aim: The overall change in Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ-10) scores
time frame: baseline to follow-up (average total of 12 weeks)
Exploratory Aim: The overall change in Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) scores
time frame: baseline to follow-up (average total of 12 weeks)
Exploratory Aim: The overall change in Flinders Fatigue Scale (FFS) scores
time frame: baseline to follow-up (average total of 12 weeks)
Exploratory Aim: The change in PAP Adherence (hours per night).
time frame: 8 weeks of active study, 2 weeks of follow-up

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants from 21 years up to 65 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - eligible subjects must have begun their CPAP treatment within the last 3 months - current ESS (Sleepiness) Scores between 5-19 - no history of upper airway surgery (e.g. UPPP) - able to understand written and spoken English - able to swallow medication - preferred sleep phase between 9:00 pm and 9:00 am - willing to discontinue any sleep medications/over-the-counters(OTCs)/Herbals for insomnia for the 11-week study period. - female participants must not be pregnant or breastfeeding and must agree to use two forms of birth control during the study period, as Armodafinil may interfere with hormonal birth control. - all participants will be asked to postpone any additional or alternate treatments for their Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) until after the completion of their participation in this research study. - for other elective procedures, prospective participants are recommended to either postpone the procedure until after completion of their participation in this study, or alternatively to start the study after completion of the elective procedure. Exclusion Criteria: - CPAP usage exceeding three months prior to pre-screening - suicide attempts within the last five years - unstable medical or psychiatric illness - cardiac abnormalities, liver, or kidney diseases - sleep disorders other than insomnia or SDB - evidence of active illicit substance use or fitting criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence - use of central nervous system (CNS) active medications, antidepressants and hypnotics prescribed as sleep-aids (these medications are permitted if prescribed for mediation of symptoms other than sleep and the patient has been on a stable dosage for a minimum of one month, with no anticipation of altering their dosage during the study period.) - inadequate language comprehension - pregnant or breastfeeding

Additional Information

Official title The Treatment of Insomnia Comorbid With Sleep Disordered Breathing Using Armodafinil and/or Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia
Principal investigator Michael L Perlis, PhD
Description Rationale: Insomnia and sleep disordered breathing are the most common sleep disorders and they tend to be highly comorbid. When they co‐occur, not only is there an increase in cumulative morbidity, but it is likely that these two diseases interact to: promote overall greater illness severity; reduce treatment adherence; and diminish treatment efficacy. The results from the proposed project will provide valuable information on how co‐treatment for these two disorders can promote improved sleep quantity, enhanced sleep quality, better compliance with Positive Airway Pressure (PAP) therapy, and better daytime functioning. Background: There is now substantial evidence that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT‐I) is efficacious for Primary Insomnia (PI), that it is as potent as sedative hypnotic treatment, and better sustained over time. Further, there is now increasing evidence that CBT‐I can be applied to insomnias that are co‐morbid with medical and psychiatric disorders, and with equal efficacy. The evidence for an expanded indication, to date, has been for insomnia comorbid with depression, chronic pain, and cancer. Interestingly, there are very few studies on the efficacy of CBT‐I in insomnia comorbid with other intrinsic sleep disorders, including in patients with Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB). This is surprising given that insomnia frequently occurs comorbidly with SDB. It is estimated that 40‐60% of patients with SDB also suffer from insomnia. The lack of data regarding the applicability of CBT‐I to insomnia co‐morbid with SDB is likely due to the concern that CBT‐I will be difficult to tolerate in patients with insomnia co‐morbid with SDB given the treatment's tendency to produce acute increases in fatigue, sleepiness, and transient reductions in attention and performance. Accordingly, the investigators of this study propose to conduct a randomized, controlled trial on the effects of Armodafinil alone and in combination with CBT‐I in patients with Insomnia comorbid with SDB. Note: The choice to evaluate Armodafinil as both a monotherapy and an adjuvant therapy to CBT‐I for insomnia has a firm conceptual basis and is supported by preliminary data from our group. The choice to evaluate Armodafinil in patients with insomnia co‐morbid with SDB is further supported by the existing indication for sleepiness in patients with SDB.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in June 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of Pennsylvania.