Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition healthy
Treatment zamar therapy ct clinic
Sponsor University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland
Collaborator Thim van der Laan University College Physiotherapy
Start date May 2015
End date December 2016
Trial size 40 participants
Trial identifier NCT02506283, KEK-ZH-Nr.2015-0113

Summary

This study investigates the effects of cooling on the recovery and performance characteristic in young healthy subjects. The study is divided in two projects:

Project A: investigates the effects of 20 min. post-exercise cooling on vertical jump performance and delayed onset muscle soreness and rated perceived exertion.

Project B: investigates the effects of 20 min. pre-exercise cooling on maximal voluntary contraction of the right M. quadriceps femoris and delayed onset muscle soreness and rated perceived exertion.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Endpoint classification efficacy study
Intervention model parallel assignment
Masking double blind (subject, investigator, outcomes assessor)
Primary purpose treatment
Arm
(Experimental)
subjects in this study receive a single pre-exercise (3x MVC) or post-exercise intervention (3x 30 counter movement jumps), consisting of an external cooling application (Zamar Therapy CT clinic) applied to both thighs. Both interventions have a duration of 20 minutes and a temperature of 8°C
zamar therapy ct clinic
Zamar Therapy is a certified medical product (directive 93/42/EEC and ISO 134 85:2012) (www.zamarmedical.com)
(Sham Comparator)
subjects in the control group receive a single pre-exercise (3x MVC) or post-exercise (3x 30 counter movement jumps) sham intervention, consisting of a 20 minute external thermoneutral application (Zamar Therapy CT clinic) applied to both thighs. Both sham interventions have a duration of 20 minutes and a temperature of 32°C.
zamar therapy ct clinic
Zamar Therapy is a certified medical product (directive 93/42/EEC and ISO 134 85:2012) (www.zamarmedical.com)

Primary Outcomes

Measure
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on vertical jump performance 24 hours post cold application
time frame: 0-24hours post cold application
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on vertical jump performance 48 hours post cold application
time frame: 24-48 hours post cold application
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on vertical jump performance 72 hours post cold application
time frame: 48-72 hours post cold application
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on maximum voluntary contraction 24 hours post cold application
time frame: 0-24 hours post cold application
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on maximum voluntary contraction 48 hours post cold application
time frame: 24-48 hours post cold application
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on maximum voluntary 72 hours post cold application
time frame: 48-72 hours post cold application

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on delayed onset muscle soreness 24 hours post cold application
time frame: 0-24 hours post cold application
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on delayed onset muscle soreness 48 hours post cold application
time frame: 24-48 hours post cold application
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on delayed onset muscle 72 hours post cold application
time frame: 48-72 hours post cold application
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on rated perceived exertion 24 hours post cold application
time frame: 0-24 hours post cold application
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on rated perceived exertion 48 hours post cold application
time frame: 24-48 hours post cold application
The effect of a 20 minute cryotherapy application on rated perceived exertion 72 hours post cold application
time frame: 48-72 hours post cold application

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants from 18 years up to 30 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - only healthy young subjects 18-30 years - no musculoskeletal surgery in trunk and lower extremities - injury history in trunk and lower extremity for more than one year - subjects taking anticonceptive medication are allowed to participate Exclusion Criteria: - actual injuries or injuries for less than one year in trunk and /or lower extremities - injury history in trunk and lower extremity for more than one year with complaints - anxiety of cooling - subjects on medication - pace maker - cardiovascular disease - pregnancy - skeletal problems - appendectomy for less than two years - Morbus Raynaud syndrome

Additional Information

Official title The Effect of Cryotherapy on Recovery and Performance: A Randomized Controlled Double Blind Trial
Principal investigator Ron Clijsen, PhD
Description The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a 20 min. external cooling application (+8°C ) versus a external thermo neutral application (+32°C) up to 72 hours post application. The study is divided in two projects: Project A: This study is focusing on the recovery process after a max. jump performance (3x30 counter movement jumps). Directly after the exercise subjects receive a cooling or thermo-neutral application. Recovery characteristics measured by vertical jump performance (objective) and delayed onset muscle soreness and rated perceived exertion (subjective) are measured in function of time up to 72 hours post cooling intervention. Project B: This study is focusing on the effect of 20 min. cooling or thermo-neutral application on the M. quadriceps femoris performance (MVC). After the thermo-application, the 60% endurance MVC is measured by means of surface EMG (OT Bioelettronica 10-750 Hz) in a ergometer chair 90° degrees knee flexion (Cor 1 Bioelettronica). Muscle conduction velocity, MVC (objective), delayed onset muscle soreness and rated perceived exertion (subjective) are measured in function of time up to 72 hours post thermo-application.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in April 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland.