Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Conditions medical education, patient safety, educational safety curriculum, surgical resident
Treatments education - bips course, formal safety curriculum, ongoing evaluation and feedback
Sponsor The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
Start date February 2014
End date August 2015
Trial size 58 participants
Trial identifier NCT02401711, HSC-MS-14-0073

Summary

The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two methods, safety curriculum in addition to online training alone, for teaching patient safety to surgery residents. Despite multiple studies evaluating educational safety curricula, the best methods for teaching residents about patient safety is unknown. It is hypothesized that empowering surgery residents to actively engage in behaviors to increase patient safety may lead to a higher quality perioperative care and communication.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Endpoint classification safety study
Intervention model parallel assignment
Masking single blind (subject)
Arm
(Active Comparator)
Residents randomized to the control group will only participate in the Breakthroughs in Patient Safety (BIPS) online training (Education - BIPS course). All residents in the comparison arm will receive evaluations on their non-technical skills, but the results will not be fed back to them until after the study has been completed.
education - bips course
The guiding principles behind the BIPS program include: (1) explaining how complex systems cause human error and how human error can lead to patient harm in complex systems; (2) diagnosing human error and identifying a prevention behavior for each of the three types: skill, rule, and knowledge; and (3) preventing error by promoting safety behaviors, such as having attention to detail, communicating clearly, having a questioning attitude, and speaking up for safety
(Experimental)
Those in the intervention group will participate in a formal safety education curriculum in addition to the currently required Breakthroughs in Patient Safety (BIPS) online training. The intervention will have three components: (1) the mandatory online BIPS course (Education - BIPS course), (2) the formal safety curriculum, and (3) ongoing evaluation and feedback of operating room performance.
education - bips course
The guiding principles behind the BIPS program include: (1) explaining how complex systems cause human error and how human error can lead to patient harm in complex systems; (2) diagnosing human error and identifying a prevention behavior for each of the three types: skill, rule, and knowledge; and (3) preventing error by promoting safety behaviors, such as having attention to detail, communicating clearly, having a questioning attitude, and speaking up for safety
formal safety curriculum
The educational program is designed to improve patient safety by informing residents about safe operating room behaviors.
ongoing evaluation and feedback
The feedback program is designed to encourage the use of safe behaviors and to discourage unsafe behaviors taught in the workshops.

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Changes in safety culture as measured by the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ)
time frame: Baseline, One year

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Learner satisfaction, knowledge, and behaviors as measured by the Oxford Non-Technical Skills (NOTECHS) system
time frame: One year

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants from 20 years up to 40 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - All surgery residents at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, from post-graduate year (PGY)-1 to PGY-5. Exclusion Criteria: - Non-surgery residents at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Additional Information

Official title How Should Surgical Residents Be Educated About Patient Safety in the Operating Room: a Pilot Randomized Trial
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in May 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston.