Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition psychological stress
Treatment observation
Sponsor Lund University
Start date February 2015
End date May 2017
Trial size 130 participants
Trial identifier NCT02378610, SP14_CarolineLinninge

Summary

The relationship between the gut microbiota and stress is poorly studied in humans. In this study we aim to look for if stressed persons have different levels of key bacterial groups compared to the levels in non-stressed persons.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Observational model cohort
Time perspective retrospective
Arm
Saliva and fecal samples will be collected from High-stressed persons
observation
Observation of the gut bacterial flora in high- and low-stressed individuals
Saliva and fecal samples will be collected from Low-stressed persons
observation
Observation of the gut bacterial flora in high- and low-stressed individuals

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Microbial quantity
time frame: May 2015-January 2016

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Markers of stress
time frame: April 2015-January 2016

Eligibility Criteria

Male participants from 19 years up to 35 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - Healthy man between 19-35 years old Exclusion Criteria: - Antibiotic intake - Gastrointestinal diseases - Diabetes - Phsycological diseases - Tyroid related diseases - Cardiovascular diseases - Celiaki - Cortisone drugs

Additional Information

Official title Relationship Between the Gut Microbiota and Stress
Principal investigator Caroline Linninge, PhD
Description The gut microbial flora will be analyzed with molecular genetic methods. Stress will be measured with cortisol levels in saliva and with questionnaire.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in March 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by Lund University.