Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition anemia
Treatment raman spectroscopy (lightouch)
Sponsor State University of New York - Upstate Medical University
Start date August 2012
End date June 2017
Trial size 5 participants
Trial identifier NCT02333136, 327074-1

Summary

The LighTouch device shines imperceptible red light into the skin and measures the light that comes back out using the method of Raman Spectroscopy. Some of this light is color shifted and some is not. Using a proprietary numerical recipe, the LighTouch device combines the signals in this remitted light and calculates hematocrit, glucose, protein and potentially other analytes. Thus the LighTouch device produces information without painful physical insult to the patient and can trend changes in these blood analytes in order to predict the need for intervention.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Observational model case-only
Time perspective prospective
Arm
subjects will be monitored for changes in hematocrit based on results of in vivo raman spectroscopy scatter
raman spectroscopy (lightouch)
near infrared light will be shone upon a fingerbed capillary and light scatter measured using in vivo raman spectroscpy

Primary Outcomes

Measure
correlation with actual measured hematocrit
time frame: 2 hours during dialysis

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants at least 18 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - adult stable on dialysis and able to consent Exclusion Criteria: - inability to acquire IVRS signal

Additional Information

Official title In Vivo Raman Spectroscopy (IVRS) of Human Fingertip Capillary Beds
Principal investigator Joseph Chaiken, PhD
Description The leading preventable cause of death for all people between 18 and 45, world-wide, military or civilian is uncontrolled internal bleeding i.e. hemorrhage. (A. Sauaia et al, J. Trauma 38, 185-193 (1995)). Internal bleeding can be very difficult to reliably detect when there is no visible external injury and the rate of blood loss is not very rapid. Two known leading indicators of blood loss are fluctuations in hematocrit and blood protein concentration. Monitoring of either of these analytes requires a blood draw and at least 3-5 minutes to obtain a single measurement. The LighTouch device shines imperceptible red light into the skin and measures the light that comes back out using the method of Raman Spectroscopy. Some of this light is color shifted and some is not. Using a proprietary numerical recipe, the LighTouch device combines the signals in this remitted light and calculates hematocrit, glucose, protein and potentially other analytes. Thus the LighTouch device produces information without painful physical insult to the patient and can trend changes in these blood analytes in order to predict the need for intervention. Previous IRB approved clinical trials over the last 10 years demonstrated useful performance for blood glucose and now the hematocrit and protein analytes are ready to be tested. Since hematocrit and protein concentrations change during hemodialysis it provides an ideal model to monitor these fluctions over time and assess the precision and accuracy of the LighTouch device for these analytes. This technique will not affect the usual dialysis treatment in any way. The subject will place one finger into the machine for exposure to the incoming light signal and sensors within the machine will detect light scatter from specfic analytes such as hematocrit. Literally hundreds of individuals have experienced the LighTouch device since 1999 and there has never been an unpleasant response or adverse outcome. The system is analagous to having a laser pointer shining on one's finger-tip. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop the device into a reliable non-invasive measure of critical blood elements that can be determined at the patient's side.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in December 2015.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by State University of New York - Upstate Medical University.