Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition chronic kidney disease
Treatment active knowledge translation intervention
Sponsor University of Manitoba
Collaborator Manitoba Health Research Council
Start date September 2014
End date December 2016
Trial size 55 participants
Trial identifier NCT02183987, REB13-0083_MOD1

Summary

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its end stage of kidney failure requiring dialysis are important contributors to morbidity, mortality and health care costs. Over the last two decades, there has been a strong secular trend in the earlier initiation of dialysis for treatment of kidney failure from progressive CKD. These trends have occurred in spite of evidence showing harms with early dialysis initiation and increased health care costs. Recently, investigators from the Canadian Society of Nephrology, including study co-investigators, have proposed clinical practice guidelines to recommend an "intent-to-defer" approach for dialysis initiation. Whether these guidelines require an active knowledge translation strategy or they will simply translate through passive dissemination is unknown.

In the investigators' proposed national cluster parallel group randomized clinical trial, we will randomize CKD clinics across Canada to an active knowledge translation strategy to defer dialysis initiation or passive dissemination of guidelines (current practice). The unit of observation will be the patient (i.e., outcomes will be measured at the level of an individual patient), and the unit of randomization will be at the level of the multidisciplinary CKD clinic. The investigators will then evaluate the kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate - eGFR) at dialysis initiation for all dialysis starts originating from these clinics to examine whether our KT strategy is safe and effective at delaying dialysis initiation. Our active KT strategy, if effective, will have a significant impact on patient morbidity and health care costs.

The investigators' hypothesis and specific aims are as follows:

Hypothesis: The investigators hypothesize that the clinics randomized to the active KT strategy will start a greater proportion of patients on dialysis later (eGFR below 10.5 ml/min/1.73m2) compared to the control.

Aim 1 - Efficacy: To compare the impact of an active KT intervention with passive guideline release on the proportion of patients followed by a Nephrologist ( > 3 months) who start dialysis with an eGFR >10.5ml/min/1.73 m2 across the randomized CKD clinics (clusters) in Canada.

Aim 2 - Safety: To compare the impact of an active KT intervention with passive guideline release on safe dialysis initiation (acute unplanned dialysis starts) across the randomized CKD clinics in Canada.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Endpoint classification safety/efficacy study
Intervention model parallel assignment
Masking single blind (outcomes assessor)
Primary purpose health services research
Arm
(Experimental)
CKD clinics receiving the active knowledge translation intervention.
active knowledge translation intervention
Access to CSN guidelines, & provider- & patient-directed infographics recommending an intent-to-defer dialysis initiation strategy will be displayed in prominent clinic wall space & disseminated to patients. Educational whiteboard video will be made available as a resource for clinic staff & patients. Each clinic will receive reports from the Canadian Organ Replacement Register (CORR) outlining the proportion of patients followed by a Nephrologist (>3 months) starting dialysis early (eGFR >10.5 ml/min), for all incident dialysis patients from the clinic, with provincial & national average comparisons. These reports, & the CSN guideline on timing of dialysis initiation recommendation, will be delivered to the medical lead for each CKD clinic. Each clinic will receive an in-person visit from one of the study investigators/collaborators highlighting the clinical practice guidelines & evidence supporting an intent-to-defer strategy, & will receive follow-up.
(No Intervention)
Clinics will have access to the Canadian Society of Nephrology (CSN) guidelines on the optimal timing of dialysis initiation (current practice). These guidelines have been published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) and have been recently presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Society of Nephrology.

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Primary Efficacy Outcome: Proportion of patients followed by a Nephrologist ( > 3 months) who start dialysis with an eGFR > 10.5 ml/min
time frame: 12 month follow-up period after intervention
Primary Safety Outcome: Proportion of patients starting dialysis as inpatients or in an emergency room
time frame: 12 month follow-up period after intervention

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Secondary Efficacy Outcome: Rate of change in early dialysis starts
time frame: 12 month follow-up period after intervention
Secondary Outcome: Outcomes of all patients followed in the nephrology clinics using provincial data linkages, wherever available (presently Ontario, Manitoba and Alberta)
time frame: 12 month follow-up period after intervention
Secondary Outcome: Quarterly proportion of new starts from each clinic, and the differences in this proportion between the two study arms.
time frame: 12 month follow-up period after intervention
Secondary Outcome: Acceptability of the knowledge translation materials
time frame: 12 month follow-up period after intervention

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants at least 18 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - Multidisciplinary clinics in Canada that provide care coordinated by a Nephrologist to patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) - These clinics have already been identified in a previous survey

Additional Information

Official title Knowledge Translation Interventions to Prevent the Early Initiation of Dialysis: A Cluster Randomized Trial
Principal investigator Navdeep Tangri, MD PhD FRCPC
Description Background: End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) requiring chronic dialysis treatment is associated with poor health outcomes and high costs. Recent data shows that early initiation of dialysis, defined as starting dialysis with an estimated glomerular filtration rate >10.5 ml/min/1.73m2 (eGFR; the measure of kidney function used in practice), has risen rapidly in the last two decades. In 2010, a large randomized trial was published that evaluated the effect of early vs. late initiation, noting no health benefits but higher costs. Despite this, in a recent national cohort study, the investigators noted substantial practice pattern variation in the timing dialysis initiation in Canada, noting that > 40% of all patients started dialysis "early", ranging from 10% to 57% across regions. The Canadian Society of Nephrology has recently released clinical practice guidelines on the timing of dialysis initiation, recommending an "intent-to-defer" over an "intent-to-start early" approach for the initiation of chronic dialysis. Since simply releasing guidelines does not ensure that the evidence practice gap is bridged, the Canadian Kidney Knowledge Translation and Generation Network (CANN-NET), a national network of clinicians, researchers and knowledge users, was established to ensure best practices for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). On behalf of CANN-NET, we propose a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a knowledge translation (KT) strategy to reduce early initiation of dialysis in patients with severe CKD. Informed by careful survey work, the knowledge translation intervention will consist of patient- and provider-directed educational tools based on the recent published clinical practice guidelines, and will include compelling visual aids (infographic and whiteboard video), audit and feedback, and in-person medical detailing. The control group will have access to the published clinical practice guidelines, consistent with current clinical practice. The investigators' hypothesis and specific aims are as follows: Hypothesis: The investigators hypothesize that the clinics randomized to the active KT strategy will start a greater proportion of patients on dialysis later (eGFR below 10.5 ml/min/1.73m2) compared to the control. Aim 1 - Efficacy: To compare the impact of an active KT intervention with passive guideline release on the proportion of patients followed by a Nephrologist ( > 3 months) who start dialysis with an eGFR >10.5ml/min/1.73 m2 across the randomized CKD clinics (clusters) in Canada. Aim 2 - Safety: To compare the impact of an active KT intervention with passive guideline release on safe dialysis initiation (acute unplanned dialysis starts) across the randomized CKD clinics in Canada. Study Design: A cluster randomized trial of CKD clinics across Canada comparing the efficacy and safety of a KT intervention targeting early initiation of dialysis in patients with advanced CKD. The unit of observation will be the patient (i.e., outcomes will be measured at the level of an individual patient), and the unit of randomization will be at the level of the multidisciplinary CKD clinic. Team: The investigators' study team includes experts in the clinical epidemiology of CKD and kidney failure, local opinion leaders from every province/region, as well experts in knowledge translation and cluster randomized design. As such, the team is well positioned to carry out the proposed study. Research Significance: Early initiation of dialysis leads to uncertain benefit and potential harm to patients with CKD, with an increase in health care costs. This topic was deemed the highest priority area for knowledge translation intervention by regional and provincial kidney health administrators across Canada in a 2010 survey. If successful, the investigators' intervention will reduce the practice pattern variation in dialysis initiation, provide a successful framework for future KT interventions, and could have significant health and economic benefits.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in September 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of Manitoba.