Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition procrastination
Treatments cognitive behavior group therapy, internet-based cognitive behavior therapy
Sponsor Stockholm University
Collaborator Karolinska Institutet
Start date September 2014
End date October 2016
Trial size 90 participants
Trial identifier NCT02112383, SU-KI-STUDENT

Summary

Procrastination is defined as a voluntarily delay of an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse-off for the delay, and is considered a persistent behavior pattern that can result in major psychological suffering. About one-fifth of the adult population and half of the student population are presumed having substantial difficulties due to recurrent procrastination in their everyday life. However, chronic and severe procrastinators seldom receive adequate care due to preconceptions and the lack of understanding regarding procrastination and the treatment interventions that are assumed beneficial. Cognitive behavior therapy is often deemed treatment of choice, although the evidence supporting its use is scarce, and only one randomized controlled trial has been performed. The primary aim of the current study is therefore to test the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy delivered as either a group intervention or via the Internet. Participants will consist of students recruited through the Student Health Centre at Karolinska Institutet. A randomized controlled trial with a sample size of 100 participants divided into two conditions will be employed; a ten week Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy intervention, and an eight week group intervention based on cognitive behavior therapy. The current study is believed to result in two important findings. First, different interventions inherent in cognitive behavior therapy are assumed to be helpful for people suffering from problems caused by procrastination. Second, both a group intervention and an Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy intervention are presumed suitable for administering treatment for procrastination, which is considered highly important as the availability of adequate care is limited, particularly among students. The current study will increase the knowledge regarding the efficacy of different treatments of procrastination, as well as enhance the overall comprehension of the difficulties related to dilatory behavior.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Endpoint classification efficacy study
Intervention model parallel assignment
Masking open label
Primary purpose treatment
Arm
(Experimental)
internet-based cognitive behavior therapy
For participants in the Internet-based condition, the modules from a self-help treatment for procrastination will be distributed weekly during the treatment period, with one module given each week, i.e., ten weeks. In comparison to the group condition, participants will not receive a therapist contact or attend any sessions. In addition, the participants are expected to complete both the reading material and the assignments that are included in each module.
(Experimental)
cognitive behavior group therapy
For participants in the group intervention condition, the modules from a self-help treatment for procrastination will be delivered at four consecutive three-hour sessions at the Student Health Centre at Karolinska Institutet, with approximately two modules given at each session. The sessions will be spaced two weeks apart, during which participants are instructed to complete assignments related to the modules that were in focus of the previous session, e.g., goal-setting, time management, and behavioral experiments, which they are advised to present and discuss with the other participants.

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Change from baseline on the Pure Procrastination Scale (PPS)
time frame: 0 weeks and 8 or 10 weeks
Change from baseline on the Pure Procrastination Scale (PPS)
time frame: 0 weeks and 24 weeks
Change from baseline on the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students (PASS)
time frame: 0 weeks and 8 or 10 weeks
Change from baseline on the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students (PASS)
time frame: 0 weeks and 24 weeks

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Change from baseline on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S)
time frame: 0 weeks and 8 or 10 weeks
Change from baseline on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S)
time frame: 0 weeks and 24 weeks
Change from baseline on the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Assessment (GAD-7)
time frame: 0 weeks and 8 or 10 weeks
Change from baseline on the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Assessment (GAD-7)
time frame: 0 weeks and 24 weeks
Change in baseline on the Symptoms Checklist 90 (SCL-90)
time frame: 0 weeks and 8 or 10 weeks
Change in baseline on the Symptoms Checklist 90 (SCL-90)
time frame: 0 weeks and 24 weeks

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants at least 18 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - Fluent in Swedish - Computer with Internet access and a working email - Registered as students at one of the affiliated universities of the Student Health Centre at Karolinska Institutet - Primary difficulties related to chronic and severe procrastination Exclusion Criteria: - Severe depression (30 points or more on MADRS-S) - Acute conditions in need of treatment; suicidal ideation, neuropsychiatric conditions (ADHD, ADD), misuse of alcohol or drugs, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and psychosis - Ongoing psychotherapy - Ongoing psychotropic medication (unless dose is stable three months prior the entering treatment)

Additional Information

Official title Group Versus Internet-based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Procrastination
Principal investigator Per Carlbring, PhD
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in April 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by Stockholm University.