Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Conditions cardiovascular disease, healthcare associated infectious disease, sternal superficial wound infection, deep sternal infection, mediastinitis, thoracotomy, conduit harvest or cannulation site, sepsis, pneumonia
Treatment there is no intervention. the investigators are interviewing cardiac surgery staff with knowledge of infection prevention.
Sponsor University of Michigan
Collaborator Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
Start date June 2014
End date October 2017
Trial size 330 participants
Trial identifier NCT02073760, 2004-0428, HAI_Umich_2

Summary

The investigators will conduct qualitative interviews of hospital personnel regarding HAI prevention practices, and use coded data from these interviews to assist in developing standardized practices.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Time perspective cross-sectional
Arm
Adult caregivers of cardiac surgery patients (e.g. surgeons, nurses, infection preventionists) and administrators
there is no intervention. the investigators are interviewing cardiac surgery staff with knowledge of infection prevention. Caregivers
The investigators will conduct tape recorded interviews with hospital staff about infection prevention.

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Preventive Strategies
time frame: During the time of the interview

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants at least 18 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - Clinical providers or - Administrators - Must work at any of 33 institutions performing cardiac surgery in the state of Michigan Exclusion Criteria: Under 18 years of age

Additional Information

Official title Optimizing Prevention of Healthcare-Acquired Infections After Cardiac Surgery (HAI)_2
Principal investigator Donald S Likosky, Ph.D.
Description More than 400,000 coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures are performed every year in the United States (U.S.). Patients undergoing CABG surgery are at risk for a number of adverse sequelae, many of which impact survival and contribute to overall health-care costs. Healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs), including pneumonia and superficial and deep sternal wound infections, occur among 16% of CABG patients and elevate a patient's risk of mortality and add excess upfront and long-term expenditures to the health care system. A number of barriers prevent wide-scale improvements in HAl rates within the setting of CABG surgery. While a number of HAl prophylaxis measures have been developed, these measures do not fully encompass the set of practices that may impact a patient's risk of HAl. Identifying cardiac surgery specific risk factors would serve as the foundation for targeted quality improvement strategies. In the absence of definitive data concerning best practices, HAl prophylaxis is variable across surgeons and institutions, resulting in unnecessary morbidity and cost. Prior work has shown the value of implementing evidence-based protocols in the general intensive care unit setting. To what extent the implementation of cardiac surgery specific standardized practices results in lower HAl rates is uncertain. An understanding of the effectiveness of this approach would certainly assist surgeons and institutions in providing safer care to their patient populations. Rates of HAIs vary from 0-26% across the 33 institutions performing CABG surgery in Michigan. This application seeks to reduce this rate by identifying and subsequently implementing standardized practices, and evaluating their impact on HAl rates. This study will be based on the prospective data and regional quality improvement activities and infrastructure of the Michigan Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons Quality Collaborative (MSTCVS-QC). The investigators will evaluate the effectiveness of these standardized practices in reducing HAIs regionally and relative to national rates during the same time period. The investigators will conduct qualitative interviews of hospital personnel regarding HAI prevention practices, and use coded data from these interviews to assist in developing standardized practices.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in October 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of Michigan.