Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition schizophrenia
Treatments medactive, smartphone
Sponsor University of Maryland
Start date September 2013
End date September 2015
Trial size 30 participants
Trial identifier NCT01953237, 1R34MH094555

Summary

We propose to develop and pilot test the effect of a mobile smartphone intervention, MedActive, on improving antipsychotic adherence among individuals with schizophrenia.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Endpoint classification efficacy study
Intervention model parallel assignment
Masking open label
Primary purpose health services research
Arm
(Active Comparator)
Individuals randomized to the control condition will be provided with a smartphone free of charge with unlimited use of the phone's voice and internet capabilities. All participants randomized to this condition will also have their antipsychotic medication adherence assessed over the 3-month period. All participants will be contacted by research staff to trouble-shoot problems with the smartphone at the end of the first week, but will receive no additional contact from research staff until the end of the trial.
smartphone
(Experimental)
Participants randomized to the MedActive condition will complete a 1-hour training session on MedActive, which will include ascertaining their antipsychotic administration schedule that will be pre-programmed into the application along with other personalized features. Each participate will be asked to use the medActive application over the following three months. All participants randomized to this condition will also have their antipsychotic medication adherence assessed over the 3-month period.
medactive
Participants randomized to the MedActive condition will complete a 1-hour training session on MedActive, which will include ascertaining their antipsychotic administration schedule that will be pre-programmed into the application along with other personalized features. Each participate will be asked to use the medActive application over the following three months. All participants randomized to this condition will also have their antipsychotic medication adherence assessed over the 3-month period.

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Adherence to Antipsychotic medications
time frame: 3 month period

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants from 18 years up to 64 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - Decisional capacity to provide informed consent - Chart diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder - Currently prescribed at least one oral antipsychotic medication - Self administers at least one oral antipsychotic medication - 18-64 years of age - English Speaking - Be able to read English Exclusion Criteria: - Has visual, hearing, voice, or motor impairment that would prevent completion of study procedures or use of mobile phone

Additional Information

Official title MedActive: A Smartphone Intervention to Improve Adherence to Antipsychotic Medications
Principal investigator Julie A Kreyenbuhl, Pharm.D PhD
Description Up to 60% of individuals with schizophrenia do not take their antipsychotic medications as prescribed, which can lead to symptom relapse, decreased functioning, hospitalization, and increased healthcare costs. Recent studies of both patient- and pharmacy-based interventions utilizing behavioral tailoring, environmental supports, and medication monitoring have shown promise in improving antipsychotic adherence. However, there is continued need for effective adherence-enhancing interventions (AEIs) that are less resource intensive and more widely accessible by the broad range of individuals in need of assistance with medication management. Over the last decade, technological advances in internet and cellular communication, including the emergence of mobile 'smartphones', have revolutionized the way our society communicates. Whereas a variety of mobile phone-based applications have been shown to be effective for improving health outcomes such as medication adherence for a number of medical conditions, few such applications have been developed for individuals with schizophrenia. Therefore, in response to NIMH PAR-09-173, we propose to develop and pilot test the effect of a mobile smartphone intervention, MedActive, on improving antipsychotic adherence among this population. We used the Information-Motivation-Behavioral (IMB) Skills Model of adherence as the theoretical framework to inform the conceptualization of MedActive. The IMB Skills Model posits that individuals who are well-informed and motivated to adhere will enact adherence-related behavioral skills that lead to adherence behaviors and favorable health outcomes. MedActive will provide personalized reminders to patients to take their antipsychotic medications as prescribed and will query them about their intentions to take the medication, the occurrence of side effects, and the presence of positive psychotic symptoms. Summaries of these ecological momentary assessments of adherence, symptoms, and side effects will be made available to the individual on the phone and to their psychiatrist through a secure, online clinician interface. Using an iterative user-centered design approach, the specific aims of this proposal are to (1) collaborate with individuals with schizophrenia, psychiatrists and an expert advisory group to develop the initial version of MedActive; (2) conduct laboratory usability testing and a short-term field trial in 10 individuals with schizophrenia and their psychiatrists to determine the preliminary acceptability and feasibility of MedActive in clinical practice; and (3) conduct a randomized pilot trial of MedActive compared to providing a smartphone alone in 40 individuals with schizophrenia and their psychiatrists to evaluate its effect on antipsychotic adherence. We will also explore whether psychiatric symptoms and neuropsychological impairments moderate the effect of MedActive on adherence. If shown to be effective, MedActive will introduce a paradigm shift in medication self-management by individuals with schizophrenia and in treatment monitoring by their clinicians.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in November 2015.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of Maryland.