Overview

This trial has been completed.

Condition health behavior
Sponsor University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Start date October 2012
End date March 2016
Trial size 15 participants
Trial identifier NCT01836952, 11621

Summary

Dietary and oral hygiene habits are known to affect oral microorganisms and disease incidence, but most research has focused on preschool aged (2-4 yr old) children. A recent experiment in our lab demonstrated a highly diverse oral microbiome in the saliva of infants without teeth (3-6 months old). These data suggest that soft tissues in the mouth serve as a reservoir for pathogens and must be considered in oral health management. The evolution of microorganisms that occurs between birth and tooth eruption has not been characterized and may have great implications as it pertains to oral disease later in life. The investigators are interested in determining how dietary changes during this time affect oral microbiota. Tongue and cheek swab samples will be collected from a small cohort of infants (n=20) at 4 time points. At the same time, a survey and 3 day feeding diary of the infant's diet will be collected. In addition, a pregnancy survey and food frequency questionnaire will be administered at the time of recruitment. Research staff will conduct a 10-minute interview at the first and last oral sample collection time. These pilot data will provide important diet-oral microbe relationships in edentulous infants, allowing us to propose and test specific hypotheses pertaining to diet, oral microbes, and disease in young children.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Observational model cohort
Time perspective prospective
Arm
Infant born via vaginal delivery

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Oral Bacteria
time frame: birth to 6 months of age

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants up to 7 months old.

Inclusion Criteria: - Women must deliver vaginally a full term baby (37 weeks or later). Women must have a healthy pregnancy without medical complications. Women must breastfeed their baby for a period of time after birth (greater than 1 week), followed by introduction of formula. Exclusion criteria: - Women must not have smoked during their pregnancy,nor have any serious medical conditions during their pregnancy. - Infants can not be born via cesarean section. - In addition, the infant should not have any chronic medical conditions and not taking any regular medications. Exclusion Criteria: - full term infant - healthy infant - initially breastfed by mother

Additional Information

Official title Sweet Cheeks: How Early Nutrition Affects Oral Microbiota Populations and Disease Incidence
Principal investigator Kelly Swanson, PhD
Description Dietary and oral hygiene habits are known to affect oral microorganisms and disease incidence, but most research has focused on preschool aged (2-4 yr old) children. A recent experiment in our lab demonstrated a highly diverse oral microbiome in the saliva of infants without teeth (3-6 months old). These data suggest that soft tissues in the mouth serve as a reservoir for pathogens and must be considered in oral health management. The evolution of microorganisms that occurs between birth and tooth eruption has not been characterized and may have great implications as it pertains to oral disease later in life. The investigators are interested in determining how dietary changes during this time affect oral microbiota. Here, tongue and cheek swab samples will be collected from a small cohort of infants (n=20) at 4 time points: 1) within 5 days of age; 2)2 wk after infant formula feeding begins; 3) 2 wk after solid foods offered; and 4) 2 wk after breast-feeding ceases. At the same time, a survey and 3 day feeding diary of the infant's diet will be collected. In addition, a pregnancy survey and food frequency questionnaire will be administered at the time of recruitment. Research staff will conduct a 10-minute interview at the first and last oral sample collection time. These pilot data will provide important diet-oral microbe relationships in edentulous infants, allowing us to propose and test specific hypotheses pertaining to diet, oral microbes, and disease in young children.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in October 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.