Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Conditions sleep deprivation, sleep
Treatments neuroeconomics task, portion size task, blood sample
Sponsor Uppsala University
Start date February 2012
End date March 2013
Trial size 18 participants
Trial identifier NCT01730742, 192837465

Summary

The study proposes to investigate whether sleep deprivation will affect a variety of measures, including hormones, immune system functioning, and behaviors related to food intake and hunger. It is predicted that sleep deprivation will affect circulating neutrophil activity, and do so via affects on DNA methylation. It is also predicted that sleep deprivation will up-regulate ghrelin, and down-regulate circulating oxytocin. Finally, it is predicted that sleep deprivation will increase participants' tendencies to pick larger portions of food, and also increase their tendency to purchase foods that are more caloric in a mock supermarket scenario.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Intervention model crossover assignment
Masking open label
Primary purpose basic science
Arm
(Experimental)
Total sleep deprivation: participants were required to stay up for the entire night before a 'Blood Sample' was taken and the 'Neuroeconomics task' and 'Portion size task' were performed
neuroeconomics task
After a night of wakefulness, participants performed the neuroeconomics task (shopping food items in a mock supermarket scenario).
portion size task
Participants are given a computer program that gives them the opportunity to choose the portions of a variety of food items that they would ideally like to consume
blood sample
After a night of wakefulness, a blood sample was taken to assess the level and efficacy of circulating neutrophils, as well as to assay blood serum and plasma for the presence of hormones involved in hunger such as oxytocin and ghrelin
(Experimental)
Sleep: participants had an 8-h sleep opportunity before a 'Blood Sample' was taken and the 'Neuroeconomics task' and 'Portion size task' were performed
neuroeconomics task
After a night of wakefulness, participants performed the neuroeconomics task (shopping food items in a mock supermarket scenario).
portion size task
Participants are given a computer program that gives them the opportunity to choose the portions of a variety of food items that they would ideally like to consume
blood sample
After a night of wakefulness, a blood sample was taken to assess the level and efficacy of circulating neutrophils, as well as to assay blood serum and plasma for the presence of hormones involved in hunger such as oxytocin and ghrelin

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Neutrophil phagocytotic function production
time frame: Change in 4 neutrophil phagocytotic function from baseline to 36hours later (after the nighttime intervention)

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Portion Size Task
time frame: Change in selected portion size from baseline to 1 hr after consuming a caloric preload
Neuro-economics task
time frame: Change in purchasing behaviour 1 hr after consuming a caloric preload
Circulating hormone levels
time frame: Change in circulating hormone levels from baseline (ie. 1930 - before sleep intervention) to 12hr later (0730 after the nighttime intervention)

Eligibility Criteria

Male participants of any age.

Inclusion Criteria: - Male - Age 18-35y - Healthy (self-reported) and not on medication - Non-smoking - Normal sleep-wake rhythm (i.e. 7-8 h per night, self-reported) Exclusion Criteria: - Major illness - Taking any serious medications - Any sleep conditions (e.g. irregular bedtimes, sleep complaints) - Any dietary issues with the food items provided - A history of endocrine or psychiatric disorders

Additional Information

Official title The Role of Sleep Deprivation in the Regulation of Immune System, Neuroendocrine Responses, and Behavioral Measures.
Principal investigator Christian Benedict, PhD
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in November 2012.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by Uppsala University.