Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition rehabilitation
Treatments learning and coping arm, control arm
Sponsor Herning Hospital
Start date November 2010
End date May 2016
Trial size 825 participants
Trial identifier NCT01668394, Ethics app. number: 20100230

Summary

Background: It is well known that cardiac rehabilitation has potential to reduce morbidity and mortality, but not all patients complete CR. This LC-REHAB trial aims to compare the effect of a new patient education method called learning and coping strategies to that of standard care.

Design: Randomised controlled trial, 1:1 ratio. Participants: Patients above 18 years newly hospitalised with either ischaemic heart disease or heart failure.

Setting: Three hospital Units in Central Denmark Region. Intervention: Cardiac rehabilitation with addition of learning and coping strategies which include participation of experienced patients as co-educators, clarifuing interviews, and inductive teaching style.

Control arm: Standard care cardiac rehabilitation with a decuctive teaching style.

Outcomes: Adherence to cardiac rehabilitation, morbidity, mortality, risk factors, lifestyle, health related quality of life.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Endpoint classification efficacy study
Intervention model parallel assignment
Masking open label
Primary purpose prevention
Arm
(Active Comparator)
Participation of experienced patients as co-educators. Completion of two individual clarifying interviews. Teaching style: situated, reflective, inductive.
learning and coping arm Learning and coping strategies in cardiac rehabilitation
Participation of experienced patients as co-educators. Completion of two individual clarifying interviews. Teaching style: situated, reflective, inductive.
(Placebo Comparator)
Usual care. Teaching style: deductive.
control arm Standard cardiac rehabilitation
Usual care. Teaching style: deductive.

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Adherence to cardiac rehabilitation
time frame: After 8 weeks of cardiac rehabilitation
Morbidity and mortality
time frame: Three or four years after last patient into trial

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Risk- and lifestyle factors
time frame: At baseline, after 8 weeks of rehabilitation, at 3 months after rehabilitation and at 3 years after rehabilitation
Health related Quality of life
time frame: At baseline, after 8 weeks of rehabilitation, at 3 months after rehabilitation and at 3 years after rehabilitation

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants at least 18 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - patients above 18 years hospitalised with ichemic heart disease or heart failure motivated for completing a rehabilitation course Exclusion Criteria: - acute coronary syndrome less than five days before randomisation, - active peri-, myo- or endocarditis, - untreated symptomatic valvular disease, - hypertension with systolic pressure over 200 mmHg and/or diastolic pressure over 110 mmHg, - other extracardiac disease, - planned revascularization, - senile dementia, - known compliance and former participation in the study.

Additional Information

Official title Effect of Learning and Coping Strategies in Cardiac Rehabilitation - A Randomised Controlled Parallel Group Study
Principal investigator Vibeke Lynggaard, MHsc
Description Coronary heart disease is one the most common cause of death in Denmark and is also a chronic disease that 300,000 people in the country are living with. Cardiac rehabilitation is of great significance for this group of people because of its potential to reduce mortality and morbidity. However, not all patients succeed in changing their lifestyle in a positive and heart healthy direction. Thus, it is a great challenge to develop new methods which can help the patients to maintain a more healthy lifestyle in the long run. A concept for patient education, called learning and coping, has been developed in Norway. It is a health education method based on a high degree of involvement from the participants and on what is important for them. Planning, performance and evaluation happens in close cooperation between the health staff and so-called experienced patients. The course begins and ends with individual clarifying interviews. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of learning and coping strategies in cardiac rehabilitation on adherence, risk factors and lifestyle, morbidity and mortality and health related quality of life. The number of participants needed are estimated to 750 ptt.s with datacollection at baseline, just after rehabilitation, 3 months after rehabilitation and 3 years after rehabilitation. It is carried out as an open randomised controlled parallel group study in three hospitals in Hospital Unit West Jutland, Central Denmark Region, where the participants newly hospitalised with either ischemic heart disease or heart failure is randomised to either the intervention group with learning and coping strategies or to the standard group without the strategies. The rehabilitation courses in both groups last for eight weeks and consist of both training and education sessions. The concept of learning and coping is applied to the intervention group by letting 'experienced patients' participate in the education and not using standardised teaching slides. Also clarifying individual interviews are completed before and after the course. The 1:1 randomisation is computer generated and is stratified by hospital unit, diagnosis and gender. All analyses will be performed after the principle of 'intention to treat'. The primary outcomes are adherence to cardiac rehabilitation, morbidity and mortality, while secondary outcomes are risk factors (blood pressure and lipid profile), lifestyle (body mass index, waist circumference, smoking status, exercise capacity and body compositions measured via DXA-scans) and health related quality of life (SF-12, Health Education Impact Questionnaire and Major Depression Inventory).
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in December 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by Herning Hospital.