Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition pain
Treatment heat pain applied using tsa or cheps
Sponsor Massachusetts General Hospital
Start date June 2012
End date June 2015
Trial size 40 participants
Trial identifier NCT01575106, 2011P000663

Summary

This study will use using fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) to elucidate how contextual learning/expectation relieves or aggravates pain experience in the same cohort of subjects and the same study session.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Intervention model single group assignment
Masking single blind (subject)
Arm
(Experimental)
There is only one cohort in this study. All subjects receive the same intervention, the application of heat pain using TSA or CHEPS
heat pain applied using tsa or cheps
TSA-2001 Thermal Sensory Analyzer (Medoc LTD Advanced Medical Systems) or the Pathway Medoc (CHEPS model, Contact Heat-Evoked Potential Stimulator, Medoc LTD Advanced Medical Systems)

Primary Outcomes

Measure
fMRI signal changes
time frame: One day

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Subjective response to pain
time frame: 1to 3 weeks

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants from 21 years up to 50 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - a) Healthy male and female adults aged 21-50 - b) No contraindications to fMRI scanning - c) Right handed Exclusion Criteria: - a) Current or past history of major medical, neurological, or psychiatric illness - b) Pregnancy or breast feeding, menopause, and irregular menstrual cycles (length of cycle must be within 26 to 32 days) - c) Claustrophobia - d) History of head trauma - e) History of impaired elimination - f) Instability of responses to experimental pain (see Study Procedures Section) - g) Use of psychotropic drugs, hormone treatments (including hormonal birth control) within 1 year - h) Non-fluent speaker of English

Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in December 2014.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by Massachusetts General Hospital.