Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Conditions attendance and truancy, student engagement, dropout
Treatment check & connect
Sponsor Northwestern University
Collaborator Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Start date September 2011
End date September 2015
Trial size 600 participants
Trial identifier NCT01487434, 180140, R01HD067500, R305A100706, STU00035771

Summary

In partnership with the Chicago Public Schools (CPS), the goal of this project is to test the effectiveness of a manualized mentoring and case management program for students in grades 1-8. Most of the current policy and research attention on dropout has focused on the dropout decision itself, even though dropout is more likely to be simply the end point of a longer-term developmental process. This project seeks to learn more about the relative effectiveness of preventing dropout through mentoring and case management programs, and to learn more about the relative effectiveness of intervening early vs. later.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Endpoint classification efficacy study
Intervention model single group assignment
Masking open label
Primary purpose prevention
Arm
(Experimental)
Check and Connect Structured Mentoring and Case Management
check & connect
Structured mentoring and case management

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Change in attendance and truancy
time frame: 2 times a year (on average every 6 months) during the intervention and 1 time a year each year following the completion of the intervention for up to 25 years

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Criminal activity and involvement
time frame: 1 time a year each year following the completion of the intervention for up to 25 years
Employment history and workforce involvement
time frame: 1 time a year each year following the completion of the intervention for up to 25 years
Health and medical system participation
time frame: 1 time a year each year following the completion of the intervention for up to 25 years
Academic achievement
time frame: 1 time a year each year during the intervention and 1 time a year each year following the completion of the intervention for up to 25 years
School engagement
time frame: 1 time a year each year during the intervention and 1 time a year each year following the completion of the intervention for up to 25 years

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants from 5 years up to 16 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - Student with 10-27 total absences in prior school year - Students in Grades 1-7 at start of 2011-2012 or 2013-14 school years - In attendance at one of the Chicago Public Schools elementary/middle schools randomly selected to be offered the intervention Exclusion Criteria:

Additional Information

Official title Preventing Truancy in Urban Schools Through Provision of Social Services by Truancy Officers
Principal investigator Jonathan Guryan, Ph.D.
Description High school graduation is tremendously protective against involvement with crime and violence, as well as against the risk of adult poverty, unemployment, and poor health. Most of the policy and research attention on dropout has focused on the dropout decision itself. Yet dropout is almost always the end point of a longer-term developmental process. For this project the investigators have raised nearly $7 million in external support from the U.S. Department of Education, the National Institutes of Health, and the William T. Grant Foundation to learn more about the relative effectiveness of preventing dropout by trying to re-engage children in school much earlier during their academic careers. Specifically, this project is motivated by findings from the late University of Chicago sociologist James Coleman indicating that one of the strongest protective factors against school failure for children is having a strong relationship with a pro-social adult - something that far too many children do not currently have, particularly those growing up in distressed family and community environments. The investigators are partnering with other researchers at Northwestern, Duke, and the University of Minnesota to test at large scale the effects of a structured mentoring and monitoring programs called Check & Connect. To date, the project has completed its pilot year, and starting this academic year will work with nearly 500 elementary and middle school students distributed across 23 CPS schools on the West and South sides of the city. Students will receive Check & Connect assistance for two academic years total.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in March 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by Northwestern University.