Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition overweight
Treatment variety of active videogames
Sponsor University of Tennessee
Start date September 2011
End date December 2016
Trial size 30 participants
Trial identifier NCT01441544, 8630B

Summary

Increasing physical activity continues to be a challenge among many individuals, particularly those who are overweight. Recent data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) showed that individuals who reported engaging in a variety of activities were more likely to meet national physical activity recommendations compared to those who reported no variety. Incorporating a variety of activities into a physical activity program may be a way to increase physical increase physical activity levels.

One method to increase variety in physical activities is to use active videogames. Videogames that use motion sensors allow a gamer to physically perform a variety of activities. Thus, the purpose ot this laboratory-based investigation is to conduct a study to examine the effect of engaging in a greater variety of active videogames on energy expenditure in 30 non-obese, regularly active adults.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Intervention model crossover assignment
Masking open label
Arm
(Experimental)
variety of active videogames
Thirty men and women, aged 18- to 35- years, recruited from the local area, with a normal body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 29.9 kg/m, will participate in two experimental sessions, VARIETY (playing the same active video game over 4 sessions) and NON-VARIETY (playing 4 different active video games over 4 sessions), with order of experimental sessions counterbalanced across participants.
(Experimental)
variety of active videogames
Thirty men and women, aged 18- to 35- years, recruited from the local area, with a normal body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 29.9 kg/m, will participate in two experimental sessions, VARIETY (playing the same active video game over 4 sessions) and NON-VARIETY (playing 4 different active video games over 4 sessions), with order of experimental sessions counterbalanced across participants.

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Energy expenditure in a laboratory session when active videogames are played
time frame: End of each session

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants from 18 years up to 35 years old.

Inclusion Criteria: - Men and women, ages 18-25 years are eligible to participate. They will be recruited from flyers posted around campus and in local gyms, and must be willing to participate. They must have a body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 29.9 kg/m2. Exclusion Criteria: - Participants who have never played an active videogame or are unable to play an active videogame. If the participant dislikes (scoring <50 on a 100 mm visual analogue scale [VAS]) playing the active videogames used in the investigation. Or if the participant engages in less than 150 minutes/week of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity over the previous month.

Additional Information

Official title The Effect of Variety on Physical Activity
Principal investigator Hollie A Raynor, Ph. D
Description Thirty men and women, aged 18- to 35- years, recruited from the local area, with a normal body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 29.9 kg/m, will participate in two experimental sessions, VARIETY and NON-VARIETY, with order of experimental sessions counterbalanced across participants. Participants will be assessed on liking of the active videogames, energy, tiredness, motivation, to succeed, interest in the games, and energy expenditure during the experimental sessions.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in January 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of Tennessee.