Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Conditions violence, abuse
Treatment "coaching boys into men" program
Sponsor University of California, Davis
Collaborator Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Start date October 2009
End date December 2010
Trial size 2269 participants
Trial identifier NCT01367704, 1R01CE001561-01, 2007-15821-4

Summary

Despite the high prevalence of adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) reported among adolescent females and substantial reports of perpetration by young males, effective prevention programs to prevent ARA are limited. Male athletes are an important target for prevention efforts given their higher rates of abuse perpetration compared to non-athlete peers as well as their social influence among their peers. This cluster-randomized school-based investigation examines the effectiveness of a program for the primary prevention of ARA. "Coaching Boys into Men" (CBIM) is a social norms theory-based program intended to alter norms that foster ARA perpetration, promote bystander intervention, and reduce ARA perpetration by engaging athletic coaches as positive role models to deliver violence prevention scripts and tools to high school age male athletes. Coaches receive a 60-minute training session to administer the intervention to their athletes via 11 lessons across a sport season. Trained high school coaches talk to their male athletes about 1) what constitutes disrespectful and harmful vs. respectful behaviors, 2) promoting more gender-equitable attitudes, and 3) modeling bystander intervention when disrespectful behaviors toward women and girls are witnessed. The current investigation evaluates the intervention in 16 urban high schools randomized either to receive the CBIM program (i.e., intervention schools, n=8) or to a control condition (n=8). Baseline computer-based surveys are collected for all intervention and control site student athletes entering grades 9 through 12 at the start of each of three sports seasons across Year 1 (Time 1). Follow up surveys are collected for these same athletes at the end of their first sports season (Time 2). Participating athletes in grades 9 - 11 at baseline are re-surveyed 12 months after Time 1 to examine the longer term effects of the CBIM intervention (Time 3; N of athletes completing all 3 waves of data collection = 1500). Primary assessment of intervention effects are based on intent-to-treat estimates, utilizing generalized linear mixed models to account for clustering arising from school randomization. Hypothesized outcomes for male athletes include a) an increase in recognition of what constitutes abusive behaviors, b) more gender-equitable attitudes, c) an increase in intentions and reports of bystander intervention regarding ARA, and through these intermediate outcomes, d) a decrease in perpetration of ARA among adolescent male athletes.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Intervention model single group assignment
Masking open label
Primary purpose prevention
Arm
(Active Comparator)
Control schools (where the coaches do not receive the Coaching Boys into Men (CBIM) training until following academic year 'wait list control')
"coaching boys into men" program
Coaching Boys into Men (CBIM) program consists of a 60 minute training for high school coaches led by a violence prevention advocate to introduce coaches to the rationale for CBIM and the CBIM Coaches Kit. The Coaches use this CBIM toolkit to provide weekly discussions with their athletes (generally 10-15 minute mini-sessions) throughout their athletic season (11 weeks). Discussion topics include how to prevent disrespectful and harmful behaviors towards women and girls and how to promote healthy choices and relationships among youth.
(Experimental)
Intervention schools (where coaches receive the CBIM training at start of sports season)
"coaching boys into men" program
Coaching Boys into Men (CBIM) program consists of a 60 minute training for high school coaches led by a violence prevention advocate to introduce coaches to the rationale for CBIM and the CBIM Coaches Kit. The Coaches use this CBIM toolkit to provide weekly discussions with their athletes (generally 10-15 minute mini-sessions) throughout their athletic season (11 weeks). Discussion topics include how to prevent disrespectful and harmful behaviors towards women and girls and how to promote healthy choices and relationships among youth.

Primary Outcomes

Measure
recognition of abusive behaviors
time frame: 3 months and 12 months post intervention
gender equitable attitudes
time frame: 3 months and 12 months post intervention
intentions to intervene
time frame: 3 months and 12 months post intervention

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
perpetration of abusive behaviors
time frame: 3 months and 12 months post intervention
bystander intervention behaviors
time frame: 3 months and 12 months post intervention

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants from 14 years up to 18 years old.

School Eligibility: Inclusion Criteria -urban and suburban public high schools in Sacramento region with athletics program Exclusion Criteria -private high schools, rural high schools Coach Eligibility: Inclusion Criteria - coaching an athletic team at one of the participating schools (intervention or control) - age 18 or older Exclusion Criteria -not coaching an athletic team at the participating schools Athlete Eligibility: Inclusion Criteria - ages 14-18 (grades 9 to 12) - student at one of the participating high schools - able to read English - participating in an athletic program led by a coach willing to participate in the research study Exclusion Criteria - outside age range - not participating on sports team at the high school in which they are enrolled

Additional Information

Official title A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Adolescent Relationship Abuse Prevention Program Entitled "Coaching Boys Into Men"
Principal investigator Elizabeth Miller, MD, PhD
Description Additional process evaluation includes baseline and follow up surveys with coaches (from both intervention and control arms), individual interviews with coaches, as well as focus groups with students to collect coach and athlete perspectives on the relevance and local impact of the intervention program.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in June 2011.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of California, Davis.