Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition suicide
Treatment asist
Sponsor University of Manitoba
Collaborator American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
Start date October 2010
End date December 2017
Trial size 110 participants
Trial identifier NCT01252927, H2009:073

Summary

The main objective of the proposed study is to evaluate the efficacy of a gatekeeper training suicide intervention program, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST), in improving medical students' knowledge about suicide intervention, impact of attitudes on someone at risk for suicide and competent use of intervention skills to recognize risk and intervene effectively compared to medical education as usual. This research project will be undertaken using a randomized-controlled trial design. Questionnaires and objective structured clinical examinations using simulated patients will be completed at three time points: 1) before training, 2) after training, and 3) at one year following the training. Medical students' clinical skills in recognizing risk and intervening with simulated patients, as well as knowledge about suicide intervention and the impact of attitudes on someone at risk for suicide will be evaluated.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Allocation randomized
Endpoint classification efficacy study
Intervention model parallel assignment
Masking single blind (outcomes assessor)
Primary purpose health services research
Arm
(Experimental)
The gatekeeper training intervention group received the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) 10.0 in addition to TAU. ASIST is a two-day (fourteen hour), intensive, interactive and practice-dominated course aimed at enabling people to recognize risk and learn how to intervene immediately to prevent suicide. The intervention was offered to students on a weekend and was conducted by three senior ASIST trainers and one junior trainer, with two trainers assigned to each training group.
asist
The gatekeeper training intervention group will receive the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) workshop in addition to training as usual. ASIST is a 2-day intensive, interactive and practice-dominated course aimed at enabling people to recognize risk and learn how to intervene immediately to prevent suicide.
(No Intervention)
Training as usual consisted of didactic teaching and a tutorial with case-based examples around suicide risk factors in their first year of medical school. Third- and fourth-year students may also have the opportunity to practice their skills with real patients during their clerkship rotations or in the emergency department.

Primary Outcomes

Measure
OSCE checklist total score
time frame: 1 week before training, 1 week following training, and 4 years following training
SIRI-2 score
time frame: 1 week before training, 1 week following training, and 4 years following training
OSCE global rating total score
time frame: 1 week before training, 1 week following training, and 4 years following training

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
self-perceived knowledge about suicide
time frame: 1 week before training, 1 week following training, and 4 years following training
self-perceived skill in helping a suicidal individual
time frame: 1 week before training, 1 week following training, and 4 years following training
self-perceived confidence in helping a suicidal individual
time frame: 1 week before training, 1 week following training, and 4 years following training
Attitudes towards suicide total score
time frame: 1 week before training, 1 week following training, and 4 years following training
self-perceived preparedness
time frame: 1 week before training, 1 week following training, and 4 years following training
Total score on Interpersonal Skills Rating Scale
time frame: 1 week before training, 1 week following training, and 4 years following training

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants of any age.

Inclusion Criteria: - all medical students at University of Manitoba Exclusion Criteria: - those who choose not to participate - those who have already taken ASIST training or related SafeTALK training

Additional Information

Official title Evaluation of a Gatekeeper Training Program as Suicide Intervention Training for Medical Students
Principal investigator Shay-Lee Bolton, MSc
Description The current proposal plans to implement and evaluate a secondary suicide intervention skills training program (gatekeeper training) in medical school students in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The main objective of the current proposal is to evaluate the effectiveness of a gatekeeper training program, Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST), in improving medical students' intervention skills with suicidal patients compared to training as usual. Secondary aims include comparisons of changes in knowledge, perceived competence and attitudes around suicide. Findings from previous studies have demonstrated a significant positive effect of gatekeeper training on suicide prevention attitudes, skills and knowledge. As well, general studies in medical education reveal that students who have been able to practice, observe, and receive feedback in small groups showed an improvement in skills and confidence over those who were given didactic teaching only. Therefore, the investigators anticipate that the ASIST training program will significantly improve medical students' knowledge about suicide intervention, and will increase their recognition and response to suicide risk compared to education as usual. The investigators also expect that ASIST training will help them to understand the impact of attitudes on suicide prevention, and will increase their perceived competence and ability to recognize and treat a suicidal individual compare over training as usual. It is hypothesized that medical students trained in ASIST will differ significantly in their ability to correctly recognize and intervene with suicidal individuals based on their use of a standardized suicide intervention model and objective assessment using standardized patients.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in October 2016.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by University of Manitoba.