Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Condition parkinson's disease
Sponsor The Parkinson's Institute
Collaborator National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Start date April 2001
End date July 2010
Trial size 250 participants
Trial identifier NCT00282802, R01 NS 40467-01, R01NS40467

Summary

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of genetic and environmental factors in the cause of Parkinson's disease.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Observational model cohort
Time perspective prospective
Arm
National Academy of Sciences/National Resource Council (NAS/NRC) World War II Veteran Twins Cohort

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Onset of Parkinson's disease
time frame: duration of the project

Secondary Outcomes

Measure
Age of Parkinson's disease onset
time frame: duration of the project

Eligibility Criteria

Male participants from 77 years up to 88 years old.

Inclusion: - Participants will be recruited from a closed cohort—the National Academy of Sciences/National Resource Council (NAS/NRC) World War II Veteran Twins Cohort

Additional Information

Official title Twins and the Risk of PD: A Clinical and Imaging Study
Principal investigator Caroline M. Tanner, MD
Description Parkinson's disease (PD) is a growing health problem in the elderly, and genetic factors may provide substantial clues toward eventual treatment and/or prevention of the disorder. The National Academy of Sciences/National Resource Council (NAS/NRC) World War II (WWII) Veteran Twins Cohort Registry is one of the few population-based groups of elderly twins. Previous studies in this group indicated that genetic factors were involved only in early-onset PD, however there was no follow-up to these studies. The purpose of the "Twins and the Risk of PD" study is to follow-up previous studies and confirm the initial findings. In this study, investigators will use the NAS/NRC WWII Veteran Twin Cohort Registry to compare the concordance rates for PD in monozygotic and dizygotic twins—at least one of whom has PD. The overall goal of this research is determine the contributions of genetic and environmental factors in the cause of PD. The study will involve traditional clinical research methods, such as a clinical examination, as well as innovative imaging techniques, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). SPECT—a nuclear imaging test involving blood flow to tissue—is used to evaluate certain brain functions. Findings from this study may help to set research priorities in PD, and to develop tools for early detection of the disorder.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in July 2009.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by The Parkinson's Institute.