Overview

This trial is active, not recruiting.

Conditions cardiovascular diseases, heart diseases
Sponsor National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Start date September 2004
End date June 2009
Trial size 985 participants
Trial identifier NCT00094211, 1275, R01 HL77141

Summary

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether seniors living in neighborhoods that are conducive to walking are more physically active than those living in neighborhoods that are less conducive to walking.

United States No locations recruiting
Other Countries No locations recruiting

Study Design

Observational model cohort
Time perspective prospective

Primary Outcomes

Measure
Physical environment factors (using geographic information systems [GIS]) and physical activity levels (using accelerometry), self-reported neighborhood environment, physical activity, and quality of life variables
time frame: Measured twice during a 12-month period

Eligibility Criteria

Male or female participants at least 65 years old.

Inclusion criteria: - Currently living in an apartment, condo, house, or assisted living facility - Able to walk more than 10 feet at a time - Able to speak and read English - Able to complete study surveys (with assistance if necessary) Exclusion Criteria: - Not currently living in one of the areas in which the study will take place

Additional Information

Official title Neighborhood Impact on Physical Activity in Older Adults
Principal investigator Abby King
Description BACKGROUND: Despite the recognized benefits of regular physical activity for older adults, people over the age of 65 remain among the most inactive groups of the U.S. population. Efforts to understand the factors influencing physical activity in this important group have been limited primarily to demographic and psychosocial domains. The importance of the neighborhood environment in influencing a host of health, behavioral, and psychosocial outcomes has been recognized. However, to date, no systematic investigation of the relationship between objective and subjective environmental factors and objectively measured physical activity levels among older adults has been undertaken. DESIGN NARRATIVE: This observational study will investigate whether seniors living in neighborhoods conducive to walking are more physically active, after adjusting for socioeconomic status (SES), than those living in neighborhoods less conducive to walking or other forms of physical activity for transportation or recreational purposes. Additional questions of interest concern the moderating effects of physical function and the proportion of seniors living nearby on the relationship between environment and physical activity. The study will take advantage of the sampling, recruitment, and data collection methods of an ongoing NIH-funded research project aimed at integrating public health and urban planning frameworks in studying the impacts of environmental factors on physical activity levels in younger adults. Population-based sampling methods will be used to recruit adults over 65 years of age who are living in more walkable versus less walkable neighborhoods of varying SES levels. Participants will be recruited from Seattle, Washington (n = 600) and Baltimore, Maryland (n = 600). In addition to objectively measured physical environment (using geographic information systems {GIS}) and physical activity levels (using accelerometry), self-reported neighborhood environment, physical activity, and quality of life variables of particular relevance to older adults will be assessed twice during a 12-month period.
Trial information was received from ClinicalTrials.gov and was last updated in February 2009.
Information provided to ClinicalTrials.gov by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).